Psychological Reports, 105, 205-231. © Psychological Reports 2009


THE BIG FIVE TRAITS AS PREDICTORS OF SUBJECTIVE
AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING



SHARON GRANT AND JANICE LANGAN-FOX
Swinburne University of Technology

JEROMY ANGLIM
The University of Melbourne


Summary.óDespite considerable research on personality and "hedonic" or subjective well-being, parallel research on "eudaimonic" or psychological well-being is scarce. The current study investigated the relationship between the Big Five traits and subjective and psychological well-being among 211 men and women. Results indicated that the relationship between personality factors and psychological well-being was stronger than the relationship between personality factors and subjective well-being. Extraversion, neuroticism, and conscientiousness correlated similarly with both subjective and psychological well-being, suggesting that these traits represent personality predispositions for general well-being. However, the personality correlates of the dimensions within each broad well-being type varied, suggesting that the relationship between personality and well-being is best modeled in terms of associations between specific traits and well-being dimensions.

Address correspondence to Dr. Sharon Grant, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Faculty of Higher Education, Swinburne University of Technology, Lilydale, Mail L100, Locked Bag 218, Lilydale, Victoria 3140, Australia or e-mail (sgrant@swin.edu.au).

DOI: 10.2466/PR0.105.1.205-231